The 5 Best Violin Strings In 2022: Reviews And Buyer’s Guide

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Are you looking for some better violin strings? Not sure what type or brands are the best? It can be confusing knowing what materials are best, and which ones will last and which ones will break.

In this post, we’re going to look at the best violin strings on the market as well as our buying guide helping you know which ones might be best for you. Let’s get started.

Quick Answer: The Best Strings for a Violin

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Our Favorite
D’Addario Prelude Violin String Set, 4/4 Scale Medium Tension – Solid Steel Core, Warm Tone, Economical and Durable –...
Pirastro Violin Evah Pirazzi Gold Set, Medium Gold Ball
Thomastik Dominant 4/4 Violin String Set - Medium Gauge - Steel Ball-End E
Obligato 4/4 Violin String Set - Medium Gauge - with Gold Ball-end E & Silver D
D'Addario Helicore 4/4 Size Violin Strings 4/4 Size Set with Steel E String
Name
D’Addario Prelude 4/4 Scale Medium Tension Violin Strings
Pirastro Violin Evah Pirazzi Gold Set, Medium Gold Ball
Thomastik Dominant 4/4 Violin String Set - Medium Gauge - Steel Ball-End E
Obligato 4/4 Violin String Set - Medium Gauge - with Gold Ball-end E & Silver D
D'Addario Helicore 4/4 Size Violin Strings 4/4 Size Set with Steel E String
Rating
Reviews
5,305 Reviews
172 Reviews
954 Reviews
177 Reviews
824 Reviews
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Our Favorite
Preview
D’Addario Prelude Violin String Set, 4/4 Scale Medium Tension – Solid Steel Core, Warm Tone, Economical and Durable –...
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D’Addario Prelude 4/4 Scale Medium Tension Violin Strings
Rating
Reviews
5,305 Reviews
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Price
Preview
Pirastro Violin Evah Pirazzi Gold Set, Medium Gold Ball
Name
Pirastro Violin Evah Pirazzi Gold Set, Medium Gold Ball
Rating
Reviews
172 Reviews
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Price
Preview
Thomastik Dominant 4/4 Violin String Set - Medium Gauge - Steel Ball-End E
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Thomastik Dominant 4/4 Violin String Set - Medium Gauge - Steel Ball-End E
Rating
Reviews
954 Reviews
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Price
Preview
Obligato 4/4 Violin String Set - Medium Gauge - with Gold Ball-end E & Silver D
Name
Obligato 4/4 Violin String Set - Medium Gauge - with Gold Ball-end E & Silver D
Rating
Reviews
177 Reviews
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Price
Preview
D'Addario Helicore 4/4 Size Violin Strings 4/4 Size Set with Steel E String
Name
D'Addario Helicore 4/4 Size Violin Strings 4/4 Size Set with Steel E String
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Reviews
824 Reviews
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Price

The Best Rated Violin String Reviews

Whether you’re a beginner or a professional violinist, you need to read some of the best violin strings reviews. That way, you can find a set of strings that you love.

Here are some of the best strings to try.

1. D’Addario Prelude Medium Tension Violin Strings

Sale
D’Addario Prelude Violin String Set, 4/4 Scale Medium Tension – Solid Steel Core, Warm Tone, Economical and Durable –...
5,305 Reviews
D’Addario Prelude Violin String Set, 4/4 Scale Medium Tension – Solid Steel Core, Warm Tone, Economical and Durable –...
  • EDUCATOR’S CHOICE – Designed with quick bow response and ease of use in mind, D’Addario’s Prelude violin strings are the educator’s...
  • SOLID STEEL CORE – Prelude violin strings are manufactured using a solid steel core for maximum durability and warmest sound. Available in both full...
  • MADE TO LAST – With its solid steel construction and uniquely-designed sealed pouches, Prelude strings have an unparalleled protection from the...

The D’Addario Prelude Set is an amazing option for violin players at all levels. These strings respond quickly to your bow, so you don’t have to miss a beat. Plus, their steel core offers a warm sound and durability.

You don’t have to worry about corrosion, so you can use the strings for a long time. That makes them especially useful for anyone on a tight budget. Student violinists will find they are perfect and an easy way to upgrade their instruments.

These strings also come in other scales to work with smaller violins, from 1/16 to 3/4. That way, you can use the strings on your first violin and get a new set when you upgrade to a bigger size. And you can choose from light, medium, and heavy tension to further customize the strings.

2. Pirastro Evah Pirazzi Gold Set Medium Guage Violin Strings

Pirastro Violin Evah Pirazzi Gold Set, Medium Gold Ball
172 Reviews
Pirastro Violin Evah Pirazzi Gold Set, Medium Gold Ball
  • Full String Set
  • 4/4 Violin
  • Medium Gauge

If you’re looking to spend more on a good set of strings, consider the Pirastro Evah Pirazzi Gold Set. The strings are medium gauge and perfect for the advancing violin player. You can use these strings on any 4/4 violin.

Each string has a slightly different construction. The G string is gold wound with a synthetic core ball-end. Silver is the primary material for the D string, which is wound around a synthetic core like on the G string. The A string uses aluminum, while the E string is stainless steel.

These strings can give you a fuller sound throughout the violin’s range, and transitioning between strings is easy. You’ll also get to sound clear with these strings. If you want something more out of your violin but can’t afford a new instrument, this product is great.

3. Thomastik Dominant Medium Gauge Violin Strings

Thomastik Dominant 4/4 Violin String Set - Medium Gauge - Steel Ball-End E
954 Reviews
Thomastik Dominant 4/4 Violin String Set - Medium Gauge - Steel Ball-End E
  • Used by Students and Professionals around the world
  • Made in Austria
  • Genuine Thomastik-Infeld Product

The Thomastik Dominant 4/4 Set is another fantastic choice for many violinists. You get strings with a medium gauge, and they work perfectly on 4/4 violins. Not all strings have the same materials, so each one has materials to offer a good sound.

A silver G string provides a bright sound, even in the low range. The D and A strings are aluminum, which is excellent for the middle register. Finally, the steel E string is useful for the higher notes.

While these strings aren’t the cheapest on the market, they’re still relatively affordable. You can use them at any level of playing once you’re big enough for a 4/4 violin. Then, you can continue to use the strings as you advance.

4. Obligato Medium Gauge Violin Strings

Obligato 4/4 Violin String Set - Medium Gauge - with Gold Ball-end E & Silver D
177 Reviews
Obligato 4/4 Violin String Set - Medium Gauge - with Gold Ball-end E & Silver D
  • Obligato strings have a core made from a modern synthetic multifilament fibre.
  • Obligato strings sound warm and full, yet have a brilliant, rich overtone spectrum and focused tone.
  • excellent playability and response throughout the entire dynamic range

Another fantastic set of strings to try is the Obligato set. The strings are medium gauge, and they all contain a multifilament synthetic core. That offers a full, warm sound, but you can still hear the overtones.

From low to high, these strings respond well to your violin playing. They’re also perfect for playing both soft and loud passages, so you can get a nice overall sound.

The D string is silver, while the E string is gold and has a ball-end. If you’ve tried other strings but don’t like other options, these may be worth it for you. Then, you can get the sound and feel you want out of your violin.

5. D’Addario Helicore Violin Strings

D'Addario Helicore 4/4 Size Violin Strings 4/4 Size Set with Steel E String
824 Reviews
D'Addario Helicore 4/4 Size Violin Strings 4/4 Size Set with Steel E String
  • VERSATILE STRINGS – Designed for optimum playability, D’Addario’s Helicore violin strings are one of the most versatile stranded-steel core...
  • STRANDED STEEL CORE – Helicore violin strings are crafted with a multi-stranded steel core, giving them great playability and a clear, warm tone....
  • FOR 4/4 SCALE VIOLIN – Scaled to fit a 4/4 size violin with a playing length of 13 inches (328mm), these medium tension strings are optimized to the...

D’Addario Helicore strings are another amazing option to consider when looking to improve your playing. This set of strings is versatile and durable, so you can use them with any level of violin and any genre as long as you have a 4/4 instrument.

They have medium tension, which is suitable for most people. And you don’t have to worry about the strings breaking down over time.

You can choose an aluminum A string, which comes with a steel E string. Or you can select an aluminum E string. That way, you’ll get the set of strings that will feel good under your fingers and make you sound good.

How to Choose Violin Strings: A Buyer’s Guide

The strings on a violin are very important for the sound that it produces. Violin strings are sold with many different variations and even among the same string brand, you will find different types of strings to choose from.

There are a few things that you will need to know before purchasing your next set of violin strings and below we have our buyer’s guide to help answer all the questions you might have.

String Core Materials

Violin strings are made with many different materials and each type allows the violin strings to produce different sounds and different results.

Gut Strings

The original core material that was used in violin strings was gut core. Gut core strings are still produced today and are widely used by many violinists. 

As their name suggests, gut core strings are made using the intestines of animals, most preferably sheep.

These strings have low tension, which is favorable to many violinists who frequently play music with complex chords and who frequently use vibrato as well.

Gut core strings have their trade-offs, however, and need to be tuned more frequently than other string types due to their flexibility.

Steel Core

Steel core strings are popular strings that produce brighter tones. These strings are developed with different steel materials and are some of the most affordable strings that are available for violins.

These strings have higher tensions and are favorable with violinists who prefer highly responsive strings that rebound quickly. 

Violinists who enjoy a wide range of tonalities will not like what steel core strings have to offer, as their tonal ranges are usually thin.

Synthetic Core

Synthetic core strings were introduced by the popular string company, Thomastik-Infeld, in a product line known as Dominant Strings.

Dominant Strings, upon being introduced over 40 years ago, had an immediate impact on the stringed instrument community.

Also referred to as composite strings, there are a variety of synthetic core strings that are available on the market today.

These strings offer many of the great benefits that gut core strings have to offer, but reduce the tonal range of the strings to a more focused range.

Synthetic core strings tend to be the most expensive strings that are available for violins.

String Gauges

The word gauge is used a lot when talking about instrument strings and it is referring to the string’s width.

For example, double bass strings have much larger string gauges than violin strings and the high E string on a violin has a smaller gauge than the low G string.

The gauge of a string can determine the tone that the string produces, its pitch, the string’s tension, and the string’s price, among many other things.

There are three main string gauges that are available for violin strings; thin, medium, and thick.

Strings with thinner gauges, you can compare the tone of your violin’s E-string to the tone of its D-string, tend to produce brighter tones; this remains true among the same strings.

Strings with thinner gauges are also more flexible and have lower tensions than strings with thicker gauges.

In contrast, strings with thicker gauges produce brighter tones that project farther and are louder.

For these reasons, strings with thin gauges are sometimes referred to as weich strings or dolce strings.

Similarly, strings with thick gauges are also referred to as stark strings and forte strings.

String Tension

The tension of a string is one of the largest factors that many violinists look for as they are shopping for violin strings.

Strings are available with three tensions; light, medium, and heavy.

The tension of a violin’s strings determines how responsive the strings will be after a bow has made contact with the strings. 

This increased responsiveness comes with a cost in how much sound the string produces.

As you may be able to imagine, strings with higher tensions vibrate for less time and don’t allow notes to ring for as long as strings with lower tensions.

The tension of a string and the gauge of a string are not the same thing, though many people commonly equate the two characteristics.

Manufacturers have developed ways to modify the gauges of their strings without making sacrifices to the tensions of the strings, and vice versa.

When shopping for different violin strings, you should experiment with different string gauges first, as this will help you learn about what feels comfortable under your fingers as you play.

Tonality

Tonality is very important to your sound as a violinist. The materials, gauges, and tensions of strings all affect the tonalities of these strings.

Your violin will also have an effect on the overall tones that these strings produce on your instrument.

To help you determine which type of tones you prefer, you should research the performances of professional violinists.

Identify some of your favorite performances and try to determine the tones that you hear. Are the tones brighter? Or are the tones darker? 

Mixing Strings

You may determine that you want your violin’s E-string to produce a wider range of tones but that you want the other three strings of your instrument to have greater tensions. 

Mixing strings is okay and comes down to your personal preferences and many violinists like to use the same models of strings for their G, D, and A strings, but also like to use gold-plated E-Strings.

In fact, this has been a common standard among professional violinists.

Your choice of violin strings will also depend on the type of music that you regularly play.

If you play music that has very fast passages on the A and E strings, then you may prefer to have A and E strings that have higher tensions and are more responsive.

However, in this case, you may also choose to have G and D strings with thicker gauges for when you play other types of music.

How Long do Violin String Last?

Note that violin strings can break and will wear down over time but how long they will last depends on how much you play.  

Most violinists playing often will change their strings every 3-6 months and those that play less frequently will change them every 6-12 months.

When you find a set of strings that you enjoy, purchase an extra set if you can so that you have additional strings to immediately use in case your original strings ever break.

Violin strings can be changed quickly, and changing strings is a skill that you should learn as you experiment with different violin strings.

How Much do Violin Strings Cost?

The price of violin strings can vary widely and you can spend anywhere from as little as $10 to over $100 for a set of violin strings.

As you are learning more about violin strings, you should shop within the lower range of prices so that you can learn more about what you like.

However, when you can afford it, you should try out a premium set of violin strings to experience the sound that they can produce. 

Best Brands of Violin Strings

There are a multitude of manufacturers, across a range of countries, who develop violin strings.

D’Addario is a popular string manufacturer that makes strings for a variety of instruments.

Thomastik-Infeld is a popular Austrian string manufacturer who has been developing the increasingly popular Dominant strings for several decades.

Pirastro is a premium string brand and is one of the most popular string manufacturers among violinists, especially for their gold strings.

Conclusion: Which Strings Should you Buy?

Sale
D’Addario Prelude Violin String Set, 4/4 Scale Medium Tension – Solid Steel Core, Warm Tone, Economical and Durable –...
5,305 Reviews
D’Addario Prelude Violin String Set, 4/4 Scale Medium Tension – Solid Steel Core, Warm Tone, Economical and Durable –...
  • EDUCATOR’S CHOICE – Designed with quick bow response and ease of use in mind, D’Addario’s Prelude violin strings are the educator’s...
  • SOLID STEEL CORE – Prelude violin strings are manufactured using a solid steel core for maximum durability and warmest sound. Available in both full...
  • MADE TO LAST – With its solid steel construction and uniquely-designed sealed pouches, Prelude strings have an unparalleled protection from the...

The best way for you to choose the right violin strings for yourself is by trying out different strings with your violin and determining what sounds the best to you.

For guidance, you can inquire about strings from other violinists and even listen to different string setups on the internet.

You may not be able to try out every violin string that is available on the market, but exploring the many options that are available to you will provide you with a good idea of the sound that you like.

If you’re still on the fence, we’d recommend trying the D’Addario Prelude Medium Tension Violin Strings.

They’re very affordable, durable, produce a great sound and while you’ll eventually want to upgrade them, will be a good starting point to refer to.

However, test a few other string sets to find the one that works best for you. That way, you can sound as good as possible on your current instrument.

Photo of author
Written by Izaak Walton
Izaak Walton is a violinist and violin teacher based out of Denver, Colorado. Izaak received a Master’s in Violin Performance at the University of Denver, and a Bachelor’s in Violin Performance from the University of Georgia. Exposed to a variety of violin methods and musical styles, Izaak built passions for music history, literature, and violin technique.